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How to make better choices

When we prepared for the meeting in Kaunas, Lithuania, our students were given the task to think about how they affect the climate themselves and to think about what they can do to live a more sustainable life. They created the following presentations:

Sustainable lifestyle by Wichita and Nelly

Simple things we can do to help the climate:

It’s a ppt about things we can choose to do, recycle food for biogas or collect PET-bottles to recycle material. It is made by Hannah, Mimmi and Thea.

The tanneries of Bosa – an industrial heritage

Crossing Pontevecchio used to be to go to work. At the other side of the river were the tanneries. Restored with the help of Grants we can nowadays take part of their history. They used to be small scale family factories with up to ten workers taking care of the smelling tasks of preparing raw hides into durable and usable leather. Italy is still a skin and hide provider at the world market ranking no5 in the world. Today the process is a lot more circular. The chemicals kept in closed systems do not affect the waterreservoirs.

The counsellor of Education of the Extremenian comunity visited our school to inaugurate the conmemorative plaques which certify our accreditation to Erasmus+ program 2021-2027 and our participation in the program Ambassador School of the European Parliament.

The Counsellor gave the degrees to participant students and teachers in the program Ambassador School of the European Parliament and said a few words about the importance of Europe in our lifes and specially in education . At the same time she highlighted the paper of educators to transmit the values of European project

https://www.canalextremadura.es/noticias/merida/el-ies-saenz-de-buruaga-de-merida-se-convierte-en-escuela-embajadora-de-europa

Our first kahoot

The 26th of October our project made a collective activity . All the teams collaborated to make a kahoot about our countries, cities and school in order to celebrate the European Day of Languages . This activity proposed by Polish team has contributed to increas the knowledgement of the schools involved in our project.

Counsellor of Education of Community of Extremadura visits our school

The counsellor of Education of the Extremenian comunity visited our school to inaugurate the conmemorative plaques which certify our accreditation to Erasmus+ program 2021-2027 and our participation in the program Ambassador School of the European Parliament.

The Counsellor gave the degrees to participant students and teachers in the program Ambassador School of the European Parliament and said a few words about the importance of Europe in our lifes and specially in education . At the same time she highlighted the paper of educators to transmit the values of European project

https://www.canalextremadura.es/noticias/merida/el-ies-saenz-de-buruaga-de-merida-se-convierte-en-escuela-embajadora-de-europa

Our Carbon Footprint

During the second term of the year 2020/21 we have been working in the IES Sáenz de Buruaga about the individual impact on the environment . We havve calculated our carbon footprint thanks to the CARBON FOOTPRINT CALCULATOR

After the calculation we worked in order to raise the awareness of our students about their carbon footprints and specially how to reduce them

Finally , our main goal was to compensate our Carbon Footprint planting more than 200 trees of native species as strawberry trees, holm oaks or pomegranate trees .

A bit of Fluxus, some Medieval sites and the grand final.

With a slight feeling of spring in the air our first trip this friday took us to the village of Malpartida de Cáceres. An old wool washing industry here has been converted into a fantastic art museum – The Vostell museum. With bits and pieces from modern society´s artefacts like cars, TV:s and motorcycles, Vostell has created an atmosphere that made us reflect upon our lifestyles in the western world. Sustainable art indeed! https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/vostell-malpartida-museum

The damm that used to keep the water for the wool washing industry.
A fountain of modernism in the garden of the Vostell museum.

Next stop on our tour was the capital city of Cáceres. The inner core of the city dates back to 25BC. The medieval walled city center is a Unesco World Heritage. You might have seen it before since the sceneries where uses in the Game of Thrones.

Capital letters for the capital city of the province.
Welcome to the historical quarters of Cáceres!
Touching the foot of a saint surely will bring her luck!

Life in a medieval city meant keeping the water resource safe. That is a task which also has a bearing on our modern life. How can we make sure that 7 billions of citizens on this earth can access safe drinking water?

The Moorish cistern of Cáceres built approx. 1000 years ago.

Underneath the old city are the remnants of its moorish past. Once built by recycled roman and visigoth building materials into arabstyle architecture, the king of Spain made sure the basin was allowed to remain intact after the reconquesta. On the way back to Mérida we saw an abundance of storks. The Extremadura region is a part of an EU-financed project to restore the habitats of the storks.

The Stork project has revitalised the habitats successfully!

When we came back to Mérida it was definitely time for lunch. Of course our hosts had prepared a fantastic paella.

The fantastic paella!

The late afternoon took us back to where we started. Not longer newcomers the feeling in the air was that of accomplishment. The tones of Halleluljah, spanish guitar and Chopin beautifully performed by students from Poland and Spain, gave the closing ceremony the right air of dignity. Certificates of attendance where handed out, the winners of an environmental kahoot where being “crowned”. The spanish team has been wonderful. Thank you! We are so much looking forward to next meeting in Kaunas, Lithuania. Let the environmental work continue. “Viva España! ahora Lituania está esperando”.

Cello duo playing Halleluljah.
Proudly presented with our certificates.

Planting trees for a better future

Waking up to a sunny morning, getting ready and dressed for a day outdoors but first we gathered at the school for a seminar about the initial survey of our project. A great job had been done by the statistical co-ordinator of the project Mr Eduardo Corbacho and his students at Sáenz de Buruaga school. Down to a detailed level of explanation we learnt about our current answers to some of the critical issues of our times. The total report is said to span over almost a hundred pages! What an effort.

The statistical co-ordinator of the project: Mr Eduardo Corbacho and his students.

After a short break close to a “swedish fika” we got on the bus. This bustrip was to take us to Cornalvo http://visit-western-spain.com/cornalvo-natural-park/ a Natural Park with holm oaks and cork oaks. On the way there we caught several glimpses of livestock.

The visitors center at Cornalvo Natural Park
A case full of protectors, essential equipment when one is planting saplings!

In the mediterranean forests on both sides of the road the famous Iberian pigs roamed in large flocks. From them comes the famous pata negra. Arriving at the main building we then got a briefing from the rangers about the wild-life of the park, its trees and flowers. We also learnt a bit about how to plant holm oaks. Then we had applied sciences! Well, anyways, we got to practice our treeplanting skills. This was an awesome thing for us. Planting a tree for a better and greener future is something emotionally satisfying. Since the trees will be protected they will also give each and everyone of us a reason to return to the park to check up on their growth, maybe even violate them a bit – leaving a carved in heart in memory of someone special on their bark in the future?!

Getting the work done!
Under a cork oak
One of the rangers together with Mrs Giovanna Nieddu from the Italian team.

The problem of deforestation has been known since late 1800s. Being a country where shepherds have roamed the countryside with their herds of sheep since the middleages has led to a loss of soil and other adverse consequenses for the environment. As early as 1867 a reforestation commission was created in Spain. Healthy forests are essential for preserving the soils and also acts as barriers when heavy rains washes the land. Another aspect of a tree is that it capsules carbon dioxide. Today we dug in to do a small part of this reforestation work!

After a delicious lunch outdoors we went back to Mérida. The late afternoon was spent in the National museum of Roman art: http://turismomerida.org/what-to-see/national-roman-art-museum/ a beautiful building drawn by the renowned spanish architect Rafael Moneo . Just outside a roman soldier – Abel, teacher in latin language – was waiting for us and inside we were given an introduction to the museum and its collection by Ph.D. Trinidad Nogales Bassarade: today in charge of the museum but earlier in her career she has also been the minister of education and culture in the Region of Extremadura.

Our host and Erasmus project co-ordinator Luis Ignacio Mur with our roman soldier Abel.
The past meets the future.
Our spanish hosts introducing us to Roman history.
Inside NMRA – the National Museum of Roman Art.
A commercial from the past.
At the arena.
A mosaic floor from a Roman villa in Augusta Emerita.